What a goldmine of entertainment this will be.

10. 67 – For some reason this was the first “lucky number” I ever adopted.  I’ve no idea why, as it doesn’t hold any particular relevance to anything for me.  Matter of fact, it’s not even that visually impressive.  I think it’s the sound it makes.

9. 88 – two fat ladies!  Maybe a couple of pretzels, or really fat ants.  Nice symmetry, as well.

8. 8 – an infinite loop, and I also like that the Italian word for 8 is “otto”, which itself is symmetrical too.  Terry Pratchett was really on to something when he visualised win his Discworld a land where the number 8 had special significance.

7. 12 – just one of those numbers that turns up everywhere… 12 months in a year, 12 hours on a clock face, 12 bars to a blues tune, 12 disciples, 12 ladybugs at the ladybug picnic.   And of course it’s the number needed for the totally excellent Sesame Street song in the video below:

6. 64 – my affection for 64 is probably borne out of enthusiasm for the 1980’s home computer that we had with this number in the name.  Plus the Beatles song.  Mainly the computer thing.  64 is a one of the binary powers (1000000, or 26), but to me it sort of sounds like the first number of that set that sounds like it’s got something to do with computers.  2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 just sound like normal numbers – whereas you *know* that 64 is a divisor of 128, 256 and 512.

Didn’t I say this was going to be pure entertainment…?

5. 3 – is the magic number.  Yes it is, it’s the magic number.  Triangles rock.

4. 69 – DUDES!

3. 42 – “A completely ordinary number, a number not just divisible by two but also six and seven. In fact it’s the sort of number that you could, without any fear, introduce to your parents.”

2. 37 – won’t have to explain this one to the Clerks fans.

And my favourite number between 1 and 100 is…

(you’re not going to like this)

Ready?

1. – mmmmm… pi…

Okay, that’s all.

Well, not quite all – clearly the numbers from 1 to 10 are special in and of themselves, and what better way to recognise this than by having them recited, in order, by James Earl Jones.  No, you’re right: there IS no better way.